Give Trump the credit

FadeDonald

Trump is a political animal

Throughout the primary season, Trump surprisingly demonstrated a never seen before acute political instinct that is hard to match.

During the February Florida Republican debate, Trump was asked about former Mexican President Vicente Fox’s comment that his country wouldn’t pay for Trump’s “fucking wall.”

“The wall just got 10 feet taller,” Trump shot back.

He then called on Fox to apologize for his foul language, reiterated that Mexico would, indeed, pay for the wall and hit Mexico for its countless sins against the United States.

In slapping down the former Mexican president, Trump reiterated and confirmed his toughness and nationalistic fiber.

Trump did the same thing when he turned Ted Cruz’s “New York values” attack into a riff about 9/11.

And again, reaffirming his patriotic values, in response to the San Bernardino terror attack, when he proposed his now infamous temporary ban on all Muslims entering the United States.

Everyone denounced him. Apparently, no one agreed with him.

Trump could not care less. For trump, the emotional punch of the ban, and the way it differentiated him from the other candidates, was the important thing and ultimately, a large part of the Republican voters agreed with him.

In New Hampshire, 65 percent supported the ban, in South Carolina, 74 percent supported it, in New York, 68 percent.

Trump calls it as it is

With no pollsters, no speechwriters, no fundraising staff, little campaign organization, few TV advertisements, no debate prep, Trump has won the Republican presidential nomination.

Trump’s achievement is not so difficult to comprehend.

He did it by pounding a simple, emotive message over and over: “Making America Great Again”. He did it not being afraid of controversy and saying it as it is. It made him stand out from a field of an original field of seventeen candidates.

Trump’s every act of outrageousness reinforced his reputation as the “truth-telling” outsider.

Challenging and changing the rules

Trump while proving to be an exceptionally skilled politician was also fortunate. Not being taken seriously, for most of the primary season, there wasn’t any organized effort against him. He won three out of the first four contests while his rivals squabbled among themselves.

The establishment initially bet on Jeb Bush, and then, tapped out financially and psychologically, did nothing to rally around Cruz, whom many insiders fear and hate more than Trump.

Rubio may have been an option but trying to go against Trump mano to mano was not is greatest idea.

All of sudden, it became clear that the only alternative to a clean Trump nomination was a contested convention.

Trump has changed all the political rules. What he has done is not easily replicable. Now it is on to the next test: Will the Trump’s recipe work in the general election or will he fade away?

It would be foolish to discount his chances.

JMD

JMD is an enthusiastic private and public events speaker, writer, syndicated columnist and social activist who most enjoys evolving in complex interactive situations.

jmdlive@live.ca

http://jmdonline.tumblr.com/

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Trump’s Evolution – The People White Knight

The White Knight

Trump’s chief strategist Paul Manafort spoke to members of the Republican National Committee on April 21.

With the nomination in sight, the transformation of Donald Trump is underway

Experienced political professionals have taken over, and a Presidential Donald Trump is on his way to win over the general electorate.

In a closed-door briefing, last Thursday April 21, Trump’s new chief strategist, Paul Manafort told the Republican National Committee that Trump has been playing a “part” on the campaign trail, but is starting to pivot toward presenting a more businesslike and presidential “persona.”

“He gets it,” Manafort told Republican National Committee members. “The part that he’s been playing is now evolving into the part that you’ve been expecting. The negatives will come down, the image is going to change, but ‘Crooked Hillary’ is still going to be ‘Crooked Hillary.’” …

Manafort argued that Clinton’s negative favorability ratings are caused by “character” issues, whereas Trump’s are fueled by “personality” concerns. “Fixing personality negatives is a lot easier than fixing character negatives,” Manafort said. “You can’t change somebody’s character, but you can change the way a person presents himself.”

Trump himself said: “I’m very capable of changing to anything I want to change to.” And, what I am saying is this: “Better believe it!”

Trump is the real deal: “The White Knight that people are looking for”

If you listen to Trump’s supporters, one of the things they cite for their attraction to him is that unlike every other politician, he is authentic. He “tells it like it is,” they say again and again. He is not like those candidates whose every word is crafted and rehearsed. He is real.

Trump is not an ordinary candidate. Trump is full of surprises and we did not see the end of it yet. His mastery of the art of effective communications is endless and up to now, the force of his personality and the emotions he channels have been powerful enough to guarantee him the Republican nomination.

People supporting Trump do not want someone who is qualified in any traditional political sense. They want someone who, like them, is hungry and angry enough to stick it to the people they hate, who will talk like them and say the things they say in private and wish they could say in public.

People of America are looking for a White Knight.

Trump may just be it.

JMD

JMD is an enthusiastic private and public events speaker, writer, syndicated columnist and social activist who most enjoys evolving in complex interactive situations.

jmdlive@live.ca

http://jmdonline.tumblr.com/

https://lefuturistedailynews.com/

http://news.thefuturistdailynews.com/

https://about.me/jmdlive/

Trump will win Republican race

Trump will win the nomination

Against all odds, Trump is on course to wrap up the Republican nomination

As I predicted months ago, Trump is going to be the Republican nominee.

His clear victory in New York on Tuesday April 19 saw him add to previous victories across the South on ‘Super Tuesday’ and in the key states of Florida, Illinois, Arizona and Missouri.

It was already fairly clear he would win the most votes and delegates in New York and the game is now whether he can win a majority of delegates before the July 18-21 Cleveland Republican Convention. A total of 1,237 delegates is required to win the nomination.

Today, with just under 850 delegates on his side, Trump has now won nearly 70 per cent of the delegates he needs to secure the Republican nomination. His closest competitor, Ted Cruz, has not even secure 45 per cent of the 1,237 candidates he would need to win the nomination.

How Trump will secure the Republican nomination

Trump has just fewer than 850 delegates and is about 390 short of the magical number to secure the Republican nomination.

Next Tuesday, April 26, he is set to win around 100 more delegates in Maryland, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Delaware and Pennsylvania.

That would take him to nearly 950 delegates with the possibility of 50 more delegates supporting him if the 50 unbound Pennsylvanian delegates decide to support him.

Then comes the critical state of Indiana on May 3, which uniquely awards all of its 57 delegates to the statewide winner.

If Trump wins Indiana, he will be the republican nominee.

If he does not, considering that he should pick up another 50 delegates in West Virginia, Oregon and Washington in the rest of May, and then sweep all 50 of New Jersey’s while winning 10 in New Mexico on June 7, he still has a very good chance.

That would give him 1,060 if he has not won Indiana or any of Philadelphia’s unbound delegates, and somewhere between 1,100 and 1,150 if he has.

It will all come down to California

California’s 172 delegates will also be in play on June 7.

If Trump wins Indiana and the support of a significant chunk of Philadelphia’s delegates, he could clinch the nomination that day.

Trump is expected to win at least half of California’s 172 and there is a clear possibility that he may win more.

If Trump loses Indiana, he will still end the primary season within 100 delegates of securing the nomination. He will still have 90-95 per cent of the delegates he needs to win the nomination and will just need to win over some of the 200 or so uncommitted delegates to vote on the floor of the Republican convention to be held in July.

The closer Trump gets to 1,237, the more likely these uncommitted delegates will push him over the line.

In other words, the 2016 race is almost certainly going to be Trump vs Clinton.

In such a scenario, the betting markets give Clinton a 72 percent chance to win the Presidential race. Can Trump bridge the gap?

He has six and a half months to defy the odds.

JMD

JMD is an enthusiastic private and public events speaker, writer, syndicated columnist and social activist who most enjoys evolving in complex interactive situations.

jmdlive@live.ca

http://jmdonline.tumblr.com/

https://lefuturistedailynews.com/

http://news.thefuturistdailynews.com/

https://about.me/jmdlive/